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End of Part Three: Conclusion of the metanarrative

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...The need to believe (Chapter 8). Examples include: Bradbury, “The Messiah” (1973); Moorcock, “Behold the Man” (1966); Manning, The Man Who Awoke (1975 fix-up); Chalker, Midnight at the Well of Souls (1977). The emphasis shifts from societal...

The Extinction of SF (or, at least, gSF)

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

1

... genre. I will be brief—for a more complete account, see Hrotic (2013)—but the gist of it is that steampunk revisited the Victorian roots of gSF, participating in the fictional worlds of the prototypic Fathers, Wells and Verne (see, e.g., Ashley...

The Raw Materials of Science Fiction

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

1

... simply by virtue of being accurate (e.g., Hrotic 2012). However shaky Poe’s role as Father of gSF, I believe Poe did make a strong contribution—but a maternal, not paternal one. Rather than indulge in a revisionist interpretation of his...

Acceptance

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...I used to think it was awful that life was so unfair. Then I thought, wouldn’t it be much worse if life were fair, and all the terrible things that happen to us come because we actually deserve them. So now, I take great comfort...

Introduction

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...There are two kinds of people in the world—sf fans and those who think everything’s fine the way it is.In 1958, James Blish published A Case of Conscience. A Hispanic, Jesuit priest and biologist with a talent for languages is a member...

The Need to Believe

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...Early in the genre’s history, religion had largely been held by science fiction authors (and, by the popularity of the stories discussed above, by science fiction readers) at arm’s length. In the Golden Age religion was dismissed...

End of Part Two: Mid-point of the metanarrative

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...Proto-SF (Chapters 2 and 3). Examples include: Lane, Mizora (1880–1881); Haggard, She (1886); Harben, “In the Year 10,000” (1892); Wells, “In the Abyss” (1896). Religion was a part of primitive culture but is now fully understood. Jesus...

Poli-Sci-Fi

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

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...Both science and religion underwent shifts in emphases as genre science fiction (gSF) moved into the early and mid-1960s. Science fiction was still about science, but the “science” was less likely to be taken exclusively from the “hard...

Cultural Evolution

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

1

... will arrange characters—one could easily write diagonally or in a circle—but, without some additional pressure, some ways of writing are simply easier than others (Hrotic 2009: 121–2). Understanding human evolution requires we recognize that our...

Gernsback and the Pulps

Steven Hrotic

Steven Hrotic is a cognitive anthropologist, currently teaching and writing at the University of Vermont, USA Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Religion in Science Fiction : The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre

Bloomsbury Academic, 2014

eBook

0

...If Verne and Wells were among the Fathers of genre science fiction (gSF), the maternal ancestors were Hugo Gernsback and John Campbell, and the womb was the American magazine—logically enough, given the role periodicals played...